Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus)

Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus) - in the mud
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Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus) - partly submerged
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus)
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Spring Salamander
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus)

Larval Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus)
Larval Stage
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Larval Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus)
Larval Stage
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Larval Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus) - closeup of gill and foot
Larval Stage
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Larval Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus)
Larval Stage
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Adapted from the U. S. Geological survey:

The Spring SalamanderGyrinophilus porphyriticus, is divided into four subspecies: Blue Ridge Spring Salamander, (G. p. danielsi); Carolina Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus dunni); Kentucky Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus duryi); Northern Spring Salamander (Gyrinophilus porphyriticus porphyriticus).

It has a characteristic light red (salmon) to grayish purple to light brown coloration with dark spots over its back and sides. They occur near mountain brooks and streams and can be found by turning over rocks in the water.

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