Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris)

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris) - environmental portrait
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris)
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris) - identifying features
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris) - peeking from water
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris) - male inflating gular pouch
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris) - male calling, closeup
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris) - amplexus
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

The Southern Toad is a medium sized toad reaching lengths around 3 inches or more. This toad can easily be distinguished from other toads in the southeast by the shape of its cranial crests. These form knobs in the area between the eyes (see diagram), and when seen from the right direction they give the impression that the toad has horns. These knobs are not well developed, however, on young specimens. Their coloration varies from brick red to brown or light gray. Sometimes there is a light line down the middle of the back which usually becomes diffuse toward the back. Males have throats that are darker than the rest of the underside.

Southern Toads breed from March to October in temporary pools and flooded meadows, and can be heard caling on warm, humid nights. Eggs hatch in 1-3 days and the tadpoles take 1-2 months to develop into toadlets
U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/herps/amphibid/species/bterrest.htm


Description: Snout-vent lengths range from 42 to 82 mm in males and 44 to 92 mm in females. Dorsal coloration is usually some shade of brown, but varies from red to nearly black. Dark spots often enclosing more than one wart are present. The cranial crests approach each other anteriorly and are posteriorly raised to form clublike knobs. A faint mid-dorsal stripe is frequently present.

Distribution and habitat: Found in the coastal plain from southeastern Virginia to the Florida Keys, and westward along the gulf coast to eastern Louisiana. Abundant throughout it’s range, but particularly common in areas with sandy soils. May attempt to breed in almost any aquatic habitat.
Source: AmphibiaWeb

 

 

 

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