Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola)

Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) - profile
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) - coloration and markings
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Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) - in water
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Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) - front portrait
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Seal Salamander (Desmognathus monticola) - under a ledge
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Habitat and Ecology

Mountain streams, small rocky spring-fed brooks in hardwood- shaded ravines, seepeages, muddy section of streams. Hides under rocks or moss, and in burrows in mud banks. Sometimes perches on wet rocks. Eggs are laid on undersides of rocks or leaves in water or seepages; also under or in logs near water.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Reproduction:
Females with 15-40 eggs have been seen June-October. Oviposition probably is concentrated in July in western North Carolina (Bruce and Hairston 1990). Eggs hatch late summer to early fall. Larval period varies in length, includes aquatic phase. In western North Carolina, larval period lasts 9-10 months, August-September to May-June; sexually mature usually not sooner than 2 years after metamorphosis; male require 4-5 years to attain sexual maturity, females first oviposit at 5-7 years

Comments:
Occasionally eats small salamanders.

Source: NatureServe via Encyclopedia of Life

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