Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens)

Eastern newts courtship behavior underwater at Maple Flat Ponds, Virginia

Eastern newts, courtship (Maple Flat Ponds, Virginia)
Photograph © Steven David Johnson (All Rights Reserved)

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Salamander, Tomahawk Pond, Virginia

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Red Eft on Moss Mountain

Terrestrial eft stage
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Red eft, Maple Flat Ponds, Virginia

Terrestrial eft stage (Maple Flat Ponds, Virginia)
Photograph © Steven David Johnson (All Rights Reserved)

Contact Steven David Johnson for image licensing


Video © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Contact Dave Huth for licensing information.

001 Red Eft, startled

Terrestrial eft stage
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information. 

Video © Steven David Johnson (All Rights Reserved)
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Music by Gurdonark (CC BY NC). 
http://dig.ccmixter.org/dig?user=gurdonark

Water sound effects provided from Apple sound library.

scanned newt
Underside view 
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens)
Top view 
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Salamanders, Tomahawk Pond, Virginia

Photograph © Steven David Johnson  (All Rights Reserved)
Contact Steven David Johnson for image licensing

Salamanders, Tomahawk Pond, Virginia

Photograph © Steven David Johnson  (All Rights Reserved)
Contact Steven David Johnson for image licensing


Description

This salamander ranges from 6.5 to 14 cm in length. Terrestrial N. viridescens (“red efts”) are juveniles and thus generally smaller in size (3.5 to 8.6 cm in length); efts are orange-red to reddish-brown in color. Aquatic adults are generally green with two dorsal rows of red to orange spots; the dorsum may also be yellow-brown, olive-green, or dark brown. The venter is yellow. Breeding aquatic males have brighter and redder spots than females (Davis and Grayson 2008), as well as enlarged hind legs, swollen vents and a broadly keeled tail, and black keratinized structures on the inner thigh and toe regions (Behler and King 1996). Terrestrial adults have granular skin, in contrast to aquatic adults, which have smooth mucous skin (Walters and Greenwald 1977).

Subspecies include N. v. dorsalisN. v. louisianesisN. v. piaropicola, and N. v. viridescens (Behler and King 1996) . However, phylogenetic analyses have identified clades that do not correspond to the current subspecies designations (Takahashi 2008).

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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

This species is one of the most widely distributed salamanders in North America, occurring primarily from Nova Scotia to Florida, and also southwest to Ontario. It prefers ponds and lakes with dense, submerged vegetation and relatively undisturbed stretches of streams, swamps, neighboring woodlands and ditches (Behler and King 1996).

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© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2009 The Regents of the University of California

Supplier: AmphibiaWeb

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 Additional Photographs:
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Courtship behavior of eastern newts at Tomahawk Pond, Virginia


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