Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis)

Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) in sunlight
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis)
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) profile portrait
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis)
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) - for scale
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Eastern Narrowmouth Toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis) -camouflaged
Photo © by Dave Huth, some rights reserved. Click image for licensing information.

Identification: G. carolinensis is distinguished from other species by foot structure and coloration. The toe tips are round and tapered, and the toes are not webbed. It has a brown or tan dorsum,a mottled venter, and usually has a dark median wedge. (Source: AmphibiaWeb)

Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) Range extends from southern Maryland to southeastern Kansas, and south to the Florida Keys, Gulf Coast, and eastern Texas. Scattered disjunct populations occur along the northern and western margins of the range (Conant and Collins 1991). Introduced on the Little and Great Bahama banks, and on Grand Cayman Island, Cayman Islands, where very abundant(Schwartz and Henderson 1988, Schwartz and Henderson 1991). (Source: NatureServe)

 

Comments: Eastern narrow-mouthed toads occur a wide variety of habitats, usually in areas with sandy or loamy soils. On land, they range up to several hundred meters from water. They burrow underground or hide beneath objects in daytime and when conditions are cold or dry. Breeding sites include lakes, ponds, sloughs, flooded roadside ditches, swamps, stream margins, rain puddles, etc., in both temporary and permanent waters. Males call from sheltered locations, often from beneath objects at the water’s edge or partially buried in grass.

The toxic skin secretions of these toads protect them from many kinds of predators and may deter ant attacks as the toad forage near ant mounds. Skin secretions also help the male cling to the female while mating.

These little toads are most active at night during wet weather of spring and summer.

Breeding occurs usually after heavy rains, mostly in spring and summer but as early as March or as late as November. Individual females produce a clutch of up to about 850 eggs (divided among several batches). Aquatic larvae hatch from floating jelly in a couple days, metamorphose into the terrestrial form in about 3-10 weeks. (Source: NatureServe)

Information compiled from The Encyclopedia of Life, http://eol.org/pages/333379/details


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